Commonly Asked Questions about Paleo Naan

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It’s no secret that my 3-ingredient Paleo Naan is one of the most popular recipes on my blog. I have a lot of people email me with questions about the naan and so I wanted to put together a list of the most commonly asked questions about Paleo Naan as well as my response + tips. If I’ve missed something, please leave me a comment to let me know!

Before I get to the list, you can see how I make Paleo Naan by watching the video below. If you like the video, please subscribe to my channel (it’s easy, just click this link). Want to save this post for later? Make sure to Pin it on Pinterest!

Can you freeze the naan?

Yes, you can.

Advice: Put a sheet of parchment paper between each naan and put them in a ziplock bag. When you’re ready to eat, just thaw the naan and reheat in a pan. They’ll be almost as good as if freshly prepared.

Mine is sticky in the middle!

Every now and then I’ll have someone tell me that no matter what they do, their naan is sticky or gooey in the middle. The naan should be chewy and slightly stretchy – but not sticky or gooey. If the middle is wet, that means the bread is not done and you should continue to cook it.

Advice: All stoves are different as are all climates – it could just be that your bread needs more time on the pan. If you don’t want to wait for the bread to finish cooking in a pan, just put the naan on a baking sheet and bake it in the oven at 400 degrees for 10-15 minutes. You’ll get a delicious and crispy flatbread that will definitely NOT be gooey in the middle. This is what I do when I make pizza crust or my crispy peach prosciutto pie.

The batter sticks to my pan!

I know some people do not like to use non-stick pans. There are good options for eco-friendly, non-stick pans out there, but if you want to use a cast-iron or a stainless-steel pan then you’ll be better off using oil/fat to help you cook this batter.

Advice: Use a non-stick pan (eco-friendly) or make sure you use plenty of fat to keep the batter from sticking.

I have a nut-allergy!

I have options for you! Try my Coconut Flour Naan or my Paleo Roti! Make sure you read those blog posts and the recipes in them as they are different from this paleo naan recipe. Coconut flour and flaxseed meal are unique and there are some things you’ll need to know if you decide to cook with those flours. If you can tolerate rice flour, I also have a 2-ingredient Rice Flour Flatbread.

Advice: Make Coconut Flour Naan or  Paleo Roti or my Rice Flour Roti.

Can I use light coconut milk?

Personally, I refuse to buy light coconut milk, because it’s like paying someone to add water to your coconut milk (though I have accidentally bought the light stuff before). In my opinion, even if you prefer light coconut milk, I suggest buying full fat and watering it down yourself. All that aside, I’ve heard that light coconut milk works for some and doesn’t for others. The consensus is that it’s difficult to use. If you are intent on using light, you can try using a lesser quantity – but no promises.

Advice: I continue to suggest that you use full fat, canned coconut milk.

I have no idea what I’m doing wrong.

Every now and then someone will tell me they’re following my directions to a T and that they have no idea what the problem might be. To this, I say… check your ingredients. I once went back and forth via email trying to help someone who eventually realized that her daughter mislabeled coconut flour as almond flour. The two are not interchangeable. Also, make sure you’re using reputable brands – and not buying your flours from large bins that may be contaminated with different flours.

Here are the brands I suggest:

Almond Flour:
Bob’s Red Mill Almond Flour
Honeyville Almond Flour

Tapioca Flour
Bob’s Red Mill Tapioca Flour

Canned Coconut Milk:
Native Forest Coconut Milk, Full Fat Canned

Reader Substitutes:

I’m adding an additional section here called Reader Substitutes. While I haven’t tried these substitutes, my readers have – so I wanted to share them with you. Let us know how your naan turns out!

Almond Flour Substitutes: Cashew Flour, Sunflower Seed Flour, Brown Rice Flour
Tapioca Flour Substitutes: Arrowroot, Potato Starch
Coconut Milk Substitutes: Kefir, Hemp Milk (use ¾ cup)

Ready to make naan? Here’s the recipe: 3-ingredient Paleo Naan
If you have more questions, leave a comment below. If you’re a naan-making ninja, leave your tips below.

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About Ashley

Hi, I’m Ashley. Thanks for being here! I truly believe that food brings us closer together. Gather around a table with good food and good people, and you’ll have the ingredients you need to create some happy memories. My hope is that you find recipes here that you can’t wait to share with family and friends.

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Comments

  1. Kat says

    Can I substitute Tapioca Flour, Arrowroot, Potato Starch with the below for keto friendly diet…?
    xanthan gum
    glucomannan powder
    guar gum
    psyllium husk

  2. Sally says

    We are trying to reduce calorie intake – roughly how many calories are there in these Naan breads please

  3. Jann says

    I love your recipes. I can’t have tapioca, arrowroot, or potato starch because of the high carbs. Because of health issues I am on a very low carb Keto diet. Do you have any other recommendations for a low carb substitute for these ingredients?

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